February 12

Blowin’ Off Some S.T.E.A.M.

The following is written by Teacher Leader and “Expert Down the Hall”, Heather Studdard (@HeatherStuddard). Thank you, Mrs. Studdard for your Leadership in leading our PD on Friday and also being a model classroom for PBL and STEAM in the Social Studies classroom! #exceptional

STEAM – the new big buzzword in education. Often times teachers hate to see these new trends move into their classrooms for fear that they will implement it and then it will be on its way out the door as soon as they understand it. For STEAM, however, this will not be the truth. There is a reason we still focus so heavily on ensuring students are proficient with 21st Century skills and that is because we do not know what the future will hold. I can guarantee that science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics fields will grow at a rate that we cannot even begin to imagine. If we do not incorporate these pivotal skills into teaching then we are setting up entire generations of students for failure.

 

One would think that all of the elements of STEAM would be covered in classes like science, math, and computer science. That assumption would be wrong. As with anything, students must be repeatedly exposed to these elements to understand that they are universal.  So, yes, this means that in the classes where STEAM seems to make the least sense, like social studies and English language arts (ELA), we must still ensure students are exposed to these all important skills.

 

 

 

There are several questions that arise when you talk about incorporating STEAM into social studies and ELA such as the following:

  1. Why do we need to do this?
  2. How do we incorporate this?
  3. How will this fit in with the other things that we must do in our classes?


Once you understand the answers to these questions it is easy to see that it is a perfect fit. Let’s see if we can answer them.

  1. Why do we need to incorporate STEAM?
  • Not all students learn well in a traditional classroom setting much like what you see in most traditional social studies and ELA classes.
  • It breaks up the regular classroom routine and reinvigorates learning.
  • It’s fun for you and your students.
  • It reinforces that it is okay to fail and that we must continually edit and revise (sounds like an ELA class to me!).
  1. How do we incorporate this?
  • First of all you must know what is available for you to use and know how to use it.
  • Research, research, research! The internet is full of ways that teachers just like us are incorporating STEAM into every class, you just have to find it.
  • Get with your math, science, and technology teachers and brainstorm and get advice from them.
  • Get creative! This is the whole purpose in STEAM in the first place and that is to think outside the box or sometimes in this case outside the classroom.
  1. How will this fit in with the other things that we must do in our classes?
  • The beauty of STEAM is that it goes hand in hand with Project-Based Learning (PBL). In fact once you learn about STEAM it is difficult to imagine one without the other.
  • The STEAM component does not have to be your end product. Don’t let STEAM drive your driving question!
  • Finally, remember this sequence: fail, edit, revise, fail, edit, revise, fail, edit, revise, success! This process is key in students learning.

So here is a challenge: if you are a Social Studies or an ELA teacher incorporate a STEAM activity into your class before Spring Break. Use the resources available at your school including collaboration with your co-workers. If you need some help getting started see the protocol card below for some ideas. Let’s blow off some STEAM in Social Studies and ELA!